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No. 52 The Tea and Sugar Train, part one.

***Please note that I am using a standard thumbnail image for all the full size pictures on this page. This is purely being done to save myself sometime.***

© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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Backup Story

What did happen in the garage between Inspector Topham and Sergeant Tallon? We last saw these two characters wressling together in issue 50. Find out in part one of the backup story, Dayshift. The plan is to publish one or two pages of the Dayshift story over the coming months. At some point possibly in April or May, the entire Dayshift story will be posted on the website, including any pages that haven't been posted.

© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
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Story Notes

'The Melbourne Cup is Australia's major thoroughbred horse race. It is run at Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne, Australia. The event starts at 3pm on the first Tuesday in November and is known locally as "the race that stops a nation".' (From Wikipedia).

Now it is probably not true that trains stop in Australia, but many other business's and work does. Including an exam I was sitting back in 1976. At a few minutes before three o'clock, half way through an exam, the teacher ordered everyone to stop writing, so we could all watch the race on television. (What!? This doesn't happen in Britain). Five minutes later the exam restarted. (I didn't pass this exam).

The Lego diesel engine used in this story (and in the photographs, see the Behind the Scenes pages below), is similar in design to the Santa Fe Super Chief locomotive produced by Lego. So this is my version of that train. It wasn't scratch built, I merely sourced the relevant parts and then followed the Lego Santa Fe Super Chief train instructions, but used different colours. The locomotive was made well over a year ago, which shows just how long I have been thinking about creating these stories!

Hairy Panic is an Australian term for a fast growing tumbleweed. In February 2016, some residents of Wangaratta, a city 230km north of Melbourne, Australia found their gardens invaded by the fast growing tumbleweed. This isn't a common occurance, but in this particular year, the weed had managed to get out of control.

Notes about some of the words used in the poem.
A Kookaburra is a large Australian Kingfisher bird and is also known as the Laughing Kookaburra as it makes a noise like a human laughing.

The bush refers to the Australian country-side or outback

Gum drops are dried blood-red sap that oozes from eucalyptus trees. The sap can't be eaten and if you did you would be ill.

There are no wild monkeys living in Australia. Koalas and possums are the only wild animals that climb trees in the country.

Gay in this instance means happy and carefree.

The complete Kookaburra song is reproduced below.


Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
Merry merry king of the bush is he.
Laugh, Kookaburra, laugh, Kookaburra,
Gay your life must be!


 
Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
Eating all the gum drops he can see.
Stop Kookaburra, stop Kookaburra
Save some there for me!


 
Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
Counting all the monkeys he can see.
Stop Kookaburra, Kookaburra stop.
That's not a monkey, that's me!

Behind the scenes

© Adrian Banfield
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© Adrian Banfield
page two.

Green Lion Comics, story and characters © Adrian Banfield, 2018.